Pharmacology Routes of Admin #5

Question

Which aspirin preparation would the nurse make sure the healthcare provider prescribed for the heart attack patient with peptic ulcer disease?

Answers

  1. Extended-release
    • Rationale:

      This is not the correct answer because a patient with peptic ulcer disease who is prescribed aspirin should only have enteric-coated, not extended release. Enteric-coated will help to not cause further damage to the stomach lining with potential bleeding. Extended-release and sustained-release capsules have individual sphere balls within the capsules which dissolve and release the medication consistently throughout the day.

  2. Sustained-release
    • Rationale:

      This is not the correct answer because extended-release and sustained-release capsules have individual sphere balls within the capsules which dissolve and release the medication consistently throughout the day. A patient with peptic ulcer disease who is prescribed aspirin should only have enteric-coated, not extended release. Enteric-coated will help to not cause further damage to the stomach lining with potential bleeding.

  3. Tablet preparation
    • Rationale:

      This is not the correct answer because tablets will dissolve and irritate the stomach lining, causing further irritation to the already diseased stomach. This preparation would cause worsening of the PUD and likely bleeding ulcers, which could perforate and cause hemorrhage and death.

  4. Enteric-coated
    • Rationale:

      This is the correct answer because enteric-coated medications have special coatings allowing the medication to pass through the stomach unchanged and dissolve in the small intestines. This preparation will help to not cause further damage to the stomach lining with potential bleeding.

Overview

Enteric-coated is a very unique preparation designed to protect the patient from damaging effects of the medication or protect the medication from being broken down too quickly in the stomach.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

Enteric-coated preparations are designed to not dissolve in the stomach, but the small intestines. A coating is placed on the medication to either protect the drug from the acidity of the stomach or protect the stomach from the drug that can cause gastric discomfort. The latter is often used for patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) or the risk of developing PUD due to medications or disease complications.

Test Taking Tip

It is helpful to understand word parts in nursing. For example, “entero-” means intestine. So enteric-coated medications are coated to dissolve in the intestines.

Video Rationale