Pharmacology Antihypertensives #8

Question

A client is taking the diuretic furosemide and is asking the nurse about foods with potassium content. Which statement by the client indicates accurate understanding after nurse instructions?

Answers

  1. "I will take furosemide along with my hypertensive medication."
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because this answer does not address potassium needs. There isn’t enough information to know if this statement would be correct, regardless.

  2. "I will eat foods like apricots, dates, citrus fruits, bananas, and drink orange juice."
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because apricots, dates, citrus fruits, bananas, and orange juice are examples of potassium-rich foods.

  3. "I will limit calcium in my diet."
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because furosemide does not elevate the calcium levels. It is not recommended to limit calcium in the diet.

  4. "I will limit spinach since vitamin K will affect my other K."
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because Vitamin K and potassium (K+) is different. Spinach is a food with increased potassium and should not be limited since furosemide will decrease potassium (K+) levels.

Overview

Clients should be taught and understand that increased potassium intake is needed when taking furosemide. Foods with increased potassium content include apricots, dates, citrus fruits, bananas, and orange juice.

Explanation

The correct answer is B. The client will understand that foods high in potassium will help replace the needed electrolyte during diuretic therapy. The other selections are not applicable to potassium needs.

Learning Outcomes

Furosemide is a loop diuretic that decreases blood pressure by increasing urine output. It also decreases the client’s potassium level, therefore the client should increase intake of potassium rich foods. Foods with increased potassium content include apricots, dates, citrus fruits, bananas, and orange juice. Periodic blood tests need to be drawn to monitor the client’s potassium level. The level should range between 3.5-5.3 mmol/L. Levels < 3.5 mmol/L is mild hypokalemia and <2.5 mmol/L is considered as severe hypokalemia. Symptoms of hypokalemia include fatigue, muscle spasms, and palpitations. The client should be taught to report any symptoms of hypokalemia.

Test Taking Tip

Vitamin K and potassium (K+) are very different but are often mixed up. Vitamin K levels affect clotting and potassium (K+) levels affect cardiac rhythms.

Video Rationale