Pharmacology Diabetes meds #13

Question

A patient returns to the clinic for follow-up for elevated blood sugar. Despite exercising and weight loss of 10 pounds, the patient’s blood sugar remains elevated. The health care provider orders metformin. The nurse instructs the patient that the onset of action of metformin is:

Answers

  1. 1 to 3 hours
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because the onset of action of metformin is 1 to 3 hours. Metformin is an oral antidiabetic medication used for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, when lifestyle changes and weight loss has not adequately lowered the blood glucose. The nurse should teach the patient about the medication including the onset of action. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glucose by reducing the production of glucose in the liver, reduces the absorption of glucose in the intestines, impro

  2. 30 minutes to 1 hour
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the onset of action of metformin is 1 to 3 hours, not 30 minutes to 1 hour. The nurse should teach the patient about the medication including the onset of action. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glucose by reducing the production of glucose in the liver, reduces the absorption of glucose in the intestines, improves the insulin’s ability to enter the body cells by peripheral uptake of glucose and utilization. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glu

  3. 4 to 5 hours
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the onset of action of metformin is 1 to 3 hours, not 4 to 5 hours. The nurse should teach the patient about the medication including the onset of action. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glucose by reducing the production of glucose in the liver, reduces the absorption of glucose in the intestines, improves the insulin’s ability to enter the body cells by peripheral uptake of glucose and utilization.

  4. 15 minutes to 1 hour
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the onset of action of metformin is 1 to 3 hours, not 15 minutes to 1 hour. The nurse should teach the patient about the medication including the onset of action. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glucose by reducing the production of glucose in the liver, reduces the absorption of glucose in the intestines, improves the insulin’s ability to enter the body cells by peripheral uptake of glucose and utilization.

Overview

Metformin is an oral antidiabetic medication. The onset of action is 1 to 3 hours.

Explanation

The correct answer is A. Metformin begins to act in 1-3 hours, so the other selections are incorrect.

Learning Outcomes

Metformin is an oral antidiabetic medication used for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, when lifestyle changes and weight loss has not adequately lowered the blood glucose. The nurse should teach the patient about the medication including the onset of action of metformin, which is 1 to 3 hours. Metformin is not insulin, but is a medication that decreases blood glucose by reducing the production of glucose in the liver, reduces the absorption of glucose in the intestines, improves the insulin’s ability to enter the body cells by peripheral uptake of glucose and utilization.

Test Taking Tip

Least invasive interventions should occur before more invasive interventions. Always look at answers which should be considered before more invasive options.

Video Rationale