Pharmacology Diabetes meds #6

Question

The nurse is caring for a client with type I diabetes and is preparing to administer short acting insulin and long-acting insulin. How will the nurse prepare the insulin for injection of these two insulins?

Answers

  1. Withdraw long-acting insulin first in the syringe, then the short acting.
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because long-acting and short-acting insulins are never administered in the same syringe. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia.

  2. Withdraw short-acting insulin first in the syringe, then the long acting.
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because long-acting and short-acting insulins are never administered in the same syringe. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia.

  3. Withdraw long acting insulin in one syringe and short acting in another syringe.
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because long-acting and short-acting insulins are never administered in the same syringe. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia.

  4. Withdraw air into long acting insulin, then withdraw air into short acting insulin.
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because air is not withdrawn from insulin bottles but air is placed in the insulin, then insulin is withdrawn. Nevertheless, long-acting and short-acting insulins are never administered in the same syringe. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Overview

Long-acting insulins should always be administered in a separate syringe from other insulins, never mixed with any other insulin.

Explanation

The answer is C. The air is injected into the long-acting syringe first. Air is then injected into the short-acting insulin, then the short-acting insulin is withdrawn, followed by the long-acting insulin. The procedure is universally performed in order to prevent contamination of the short-acting insulin with the long-acting insulin.

Learning Outcomes

Preparation of long-acting is unique since it is never mixed with any other insulin. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia. Short and rapid-acting insulins may be mixed with intermediate-acting insulins, but is done carefully, following evidence-based methods to prevent contamination and risks of an unintentional hypoglycemic reaction.

Test Taking Tip

Long-acting and short-acting insulins are never administered in the same syringe. This is due to evidence-based practice because of the significant risk of prolonged hypoglycemia if the long-acting insulin contaminates any other insulin. The safest, evidence-based practice is to always give the long-acting insulin using a separate syringe as a separate shot to prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia.

Video Rationale