Patho Patho #71

Question

What is the pathophysiology of primary gout?

Answers

  1. 1. An underlying bone marrow disorder.
    • Rationale:

      This answer choice is not correct because gout is not a disease of the bone marrow. It is caused by a buildup of uric acid within the body.

  2. 2. Cancer clients receiving chemotherapy.
    • Rationale:

      This answer choice is not correct as primary gout is not the result of chemotherapy used to treat cancer.

  3. 3. Decreased renal excretion of uric acid.
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because primary gout results from the decreased renal excretion of uric acid by the kidneys.

  4. 4. An open wound usually found on the great toe.
    • Rationale:

      This answer choice is not correct because an open wound on the great toe may be a manifestation of gout; however it is not the underlying pathophysiology of gout.

Overview

The focus of this question is asking the nurse to identify the underlying pathophysiology of the development of gout. The symptoms of gout are caused by the deposition of uric acid into the joints. Decreased renal excretion of uric acid can lead to this buildup and crystallization of uric acid within the body. Gout is characterized by attacks and remissions.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

Primary gout is a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, erythema, and tenderness within the joints. These manifestations result from the buildup and crystallization of uric acid within the joints. Decreased renal function can lead to the buildup of uric acid within the body and therefore within the joints. Acute attacks are usually treated with non-steroidal inflammatory agents while chronic gout is usually managed with medications such as colchicine.

Test Taking Tip

Make sure you read the stem of the question carefully before answering Secondary conditions are caused by something else, such as chemotherapy which can trigger a gout attack as tumor cells are attacked. The underlying patho of primary gout is the build up of excess uric acid within the body.

Video Rationale