Medical Surgical Peptic ulcers #2

Question

A client questions the nurse about his prescription of famotidine for peptic ulcers. Which statement by the nurse appropriately explains the action of this medication?

Answers

  1. “Famotidine works by decreasing stomach acid production.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because famotidine is an H2 receptor antagonist. H2 receptor antagonists decrease stomach acid production. Examples of H2 receptor antagonists include famotidine, ranitidine, and nizatidine.

  2. “Famotidine works by neutralizing gastric secretions.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because that is the work of an antacid. Antacids neutralize gastric acid by forming a foamy layer around the stomach contents. Examples of antacids include Maalox, Mylanta and Gaviscon (aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, and simethicone.)

  3. “Famotidine binds to the ulcer surface to protect the stomach.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because a mucosal barrier protectant binds to the ulcer surface in order to protect the stomach mucosa. Examples of a mucosal barrier protectant include Orafate and Carafate (sucralfate).

  4. “Famotidine increases mucus to protect the stomach from ulceration.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because meds that increase mucus to protect the stomach are called prostaglandin analogues. An example of this drug classification would be misoprostol. Prostaglandin analogues are usually indicated for use by people who are taking NSAIDs or are at high risk for NSAID-induced ulcers.

Overview

Famotidine is an H2 receptor antagonist. H2 receptor antagonists decrease stomach acid production.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

Famotidine is an H2 receptor antagonist. H2 receptor antagonists decrease stomach acid production. This is done by stopping parietal cells which produce stomach acid. Examples of H2 receptor antagonists include famotidine, ranitidine, and nizatidine. Antacids neutralize gastric acid by forming a foamy layer around the stomach contents. Mucosal barrier protectants bind to the ulcer surface in order to protect the stomach mucosa. Prostaglandin analogues increase mucus to protect the stomach. These are usually only prescribed when a client is taking NSAIDs and is at higher risk for ulceration.

Test Taking Tip

Have knowledge of drug classifications and their mechanisms of action.

Video Rationale