Medical Surgical Glomerulonephritis and Nephrosis #1

Question

A client is newly diagnosed with glomerulonephritis and has symptoms of proteinuria, hematuria, and oliguria. The client also has coca-colored urine, edema of the face, legs, and feet. The client asks the nurse what caused the condition. Which response does the nurse provide to the client?

Answers

  1. “It may have followed an infection that occurred 2-3 weeks prior.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because this response by the nurse is appropriate as glomerulonephritis often develops as a result of an infection elsewhere in the body. Glomeruli are responsible for removing excess fluid, electrolytes and waste from the bloodstream and passing them outside of the body via the urine.

  2. “It probably occurred because your partner had herpes.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because herpes is a viral infection and glomerulonephritis is caused by a bacterial infection; therefore, this is not an appropriate response to the client by the nurse.

  3. “There is no cause as it happens without warning.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because glomerulonephritis develops after an infection that occurs elsewhere in the body; therefore, this is not an appropriate response to the client by the nurse.

  4. “It probably was caused by too little sodium.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because sodium intake does not cause glomerulonephritis; however, increased sodium intake can worsen fluid retention associated with this disorder.

Overview

Glomerulonephritis is inflammation of the tiny filters (i.e., glomeruli) in the kidneys. Glomeruli are responsible for removing excess fluid, electrolytes and waste from the bloodstream and passing them outside of the body via the urine.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

Glomeruli are responsible for removing excess fluid, electrolytes and waste from the bloodstream and passing them outside of the body via the urine. Glomerulonephritis often develops two to three weeks after an infection somewhere else in the body. Most often A-beta-hemolytic streptococcus is the offending bacterium. Antigen-antibody complexes are trapped in the glomerulus.

Test Taking Tip

Consider the etiology of glomerulonephritis to answer this question correctly.

Video Rationale