Medical Surgical Esophageal varices #4

Question

Which statement by the client indicates a need for further education regarding esophageal varices?

Answers

  1. “My cirrhosis caused my esophagus to have open sores that sometimes bleed.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because the client does need further education about esophageal varices since they are not “open sores that sometimes bleedâ€. Cirrhosis is usually the cause of esophageal varices because damage and scar tissues causes blockage of normal blood flow and hypertension, causing increased blood pressure in small blood vessels which can affect vessels of the lower esophagus. This causes the swollen or bulging veins in the esophagus. These vessels can rupture and bleed, causing life threatening hemorrhage. Clients should be taught to understand what esophageal varices are and how to prevent rupture and bleeding, if possible.

  2. “My drinking has caused liver problems that caused veins in my esophagus to swell.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the client does not need further education. Cirrhosis is usually the cause of esophageal varices because damage and scar tissues causes blockage of normal blood flow and hypertension, causing increased blood pressure in small blood vessels which can affect vessels of the lower esophagus. This causes the swollen or bulging veins in the esophagus. These vessels can rupture and bleed, causing life threatening hemorrhage.

  3. “My cirrhosis of the liver caused the veins in my esophagus to enlarge.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the client does not need further education. Cirrhosis is usually the cause of esophageal varices because damage and scar tissues causes blockage of normal blood flow and hypertension, causing increased blood pressure in small blood vessels which can affect vessels of the lower esophagus. This causes the swollen or bulging veins in the esophagus. These vessels can rupture and bleed, causing life threatening hemorrhage.

  4. “Pressure inside my liver caused increased pressure in the veins inside my esophagus.”
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because the client does not need further education. Cirrhosis is usually the cause of esophageal varices because damage and scar tissues causes blockage of normal blood flow and hypertension, causing increased blood pressure in small blood vessels which can affect vessels of the lower esophagus. This causes the swollen or bulging veins in the esophagus. These vessels can rupture and bleed, causing life threatening hemorrhage.

Overview

Esophageal varices are swollen, bulging veins located in the lower esophagus. This occurs as the result of increased blood pressure in the portal vein associated with liver disease.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

Esophageal varices are swollen, bulging veins located in the lower esophagus. This occurs as the result of increased blood pressure in the portal vein. The hypertension in the portal vein is associated with liver damage related to cirrhosis of the liver. The varices can be easily damaged, then rupture, and bleed. If the client is bleeding from ruptured varices, this can be life threatening. Clients should be taught to understand what esophageal varices are and how to prevent rupture and bleeding, if possible.

Test Taking Tip

Client education and understanding is a real focus of NCLEX-style questions since they indicate that the nurse understands and can effectively explain things to the client. Focus your studies for medical surgical nursing on client education.

Video Rationale