Medical Surgical Critical Care Burns #3

Question

A client is brought to the hospital with fluid-filled shiny blisters over the trunk, arms, legs, and perineum that are extremely painful. Which type of burn is the client experiencing?

Answers

  1. First-degree burn
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because first-degree burns appear red, but have no blisters. Second-degree burns affect the first layer of skin and extend to the dermis and are usually red, shiny, with fluid-filled blisters, and extremely painful. Both are partial-thickness burns.

  2. Second-degree burn
    • Rationale:

      This answer is correct because second-degree burns affect the first layer of skin and extend to the dermis and are usually red, shiny, with fluid-filled blisters, and extremely painful. Both are partial-thickness burns.

  3. Third-degree burn
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because third-degree burns extend through the subcutaneous layer of skin and may appear dry, waxy, white leathery, or charred black in color

  4. Fourth-degree burn
    • Rationale:

      This answer is not correct because fourth-degree burns extend into the muscle and bone and usually have no pain since the nerve receptors are destroyed. Fourth-degree burns may appear white or black and charred and may have eschar formation.

Overview

The client is experiencing second-degree burns. Second-degree burns appear as red, shiny, fluid-filled blisters, and extremely painful extending to the dermis of the skin.

Explanation

Learning Outcomes

There are four types of burns which include first-degree, second-degree, third-degree, and fourth-degree. First-degree burns affect the outer layer of skin called the epidermis and are usually red without blisters. Second-degree burns affect the first layer of skin and extend to the dermis and are usually red, shiny, with fluid-filled blisters, and extremely painful. Both are partial-thickness burns. Third-degree burns may extend to the subcutaneous layer of tissue and appear as dry, waxy, white leathery, or charred black in color. Fourth-degree burns extend into the muscle and bone and usually have no pain since the nerve receptors are destroyed. Fourth-degree burns may appear white or black and charred and may have eschar formation. Third- and fourth-degree burns are full-thickness burns.

Test Taking Tip

Know the four degrees of burns and the appearance of each.

Video Rationale